Nikola Tesla's New Wireless

Average: 5 (1 vote)
December 24th, 1909
Type: 
Page numbers: 
893
Mr. Nikola Tesla has announced that as the result of experiments conducted at Shoreham, Long Island, he has perfected a new system of wireless telegraphy and telephony in which the principles of transmission are the direct opposite of Hertzian wave transmission. In the latter, he says, the transmission is effected by rays akin to light, which pass through the air and cannot be transmitted through the ground, while in the former the Hertz waves are practically suppressed and the entire energy of the current is transmitted through the ground exactly as though a big wire. Mr. Tesla adds that in... continue reading »

Tesla's Electrical Control of Moving Vessels or Vehicles from a Distance

Average: 5 (1 vote)
November 17th, 1898
Type: 
Page numbers: 
489-491
In view of the public interest of late in anything which has a warlike appearance or apparatus tending to render war less probable by making it more horrible and destructive, and in view also of numerous recent disasters at sea, the current descriptions in the daily papers of a new invention of Mr. Tesla and reported interviews with him have been received with widely differing comments. In Mr. Tesla’s own words, the invention consists of a complete and practicable solution of the problem of controlling from a given point the operation of the propelling engines, the steering apparatus and... continue reading »

High Frequency Oscillators for Electro-therapeutic and Other Purposes *

Average: 5 (1 vote)
November 17th, 1898
Type: 
Page numbers: 
477-481
Some theoretical possibilities offered by currents of very high frequency and observations which I casually made while pursuing experiments with alternating currents, as well as the stimulating influence of the work of Hertz and of views boldly put forth by Oliver Lodge, determined me some time during 1889 to enter a systematic investigation of high frequency phenomena, and the results soon reached were such as to justify further efforts towards providing the laboratory with efficient means for carrying on the research in this particular field, which has proved itself so fruitful since. As a... continue reading »

Tesla's Complaint to Electrical Engineer Editor w/ Response

Average: 4 (1 vote)
November 24th, 1898
Type: 
Page numbers: 
514 & 515
Mr. Tesla to His Friends. New York, Nov. 18, 1898 46 & 48 East Houston St. Editor of The Electrical Engineer, 120 Liberty St., New York City. Sir — By publishing in your columns of Nov. 17 my recent contribution to the Electro-Therapeutic Society you have finally succeeded — after many vain attempts made during a number of years — in causing me a serious injury. It has cost me great pains to write that paper, and I have expected to see it appear among other dignified contributions of its kind, and, I confess, the wound is deep. But you will have no opportunity for inflicting a similar one... continue reading »

Mr. Tesla on Thermo Electricity

Average: 5 (1 vote)
December 23rd, 1896
Type: 
Page numbers: 
655
In a letter to the editor of the Buffalo Enquirer, Mr. Nikola Tesla replies as follows in regard to an inquiry on the subject of the future of electricity: “The transmission of power has interested me not only as a technical problem, but far more in its bearing upon the welfare of mankind. In this sense I have expressed myself in a lecture, delivered some time ago. “Since electrical transmission of energy is a process much more economical than any other we know of, it necessarily must play an important part in the future, no matter how the primary energy is derived from the sun. Of all the... continue reading »

Alternate Currents of High Potential and High Frequency — III

Average: 5 (2 votes)
January 25th, 1893
Type: 
Page numbers: 
88-90
(Concluded.) One of the most interesting results arrived at in pursuing these experiments, is the demonstration of the fact that a gaseous medium, upon which vibration is impressed by rapid changes of electrostatic potential, is rigid. In illustration of this result an experiment may be cited: A glass tube about 1 inch in diameter and 3 feet long, with outside condenser coatings on the ends, was exhausted to a certain point, when, the tube being suspended freely from a wire connecting the upper coating to one of the terminals of the coil, the discharge appeared in the form of a luminous... continue reading »

The Tesla Lecture in St. Louis

Average: 4 (3 votes)
March 8th, 1893
Type: 
Page numbers: 
248-249
Nikola Tesla. The Tesla lecture was a notable feature of the convention. At first it had been proposed to deliver the lecture in a small hall, but the demand for tickets was so enormous that it was decided, as a matter of sheer necessity, to secure a larger auditorium, and this was found in the Exhibition Theatre, which seats about 4,000 people. It was, of course, practically impossible that all could hear and see, but those who were there could at least say they had seen Mr. Tesla afar off and witnessed some of his most striking experiments. The hall was crowded to suffocation, and the... continue reading »

The Physiological and Other Effects of High Frequency Currents

No votes yet
February 11th, 1893
Type: 
Page numbers: 
122
In The Electrical Engineer of January 25, 1893, I note an article by Mr. A. A. C. Swinton, referring to my experiments with high frequency currents. Mr. Swinton uses in these experiments the method of converting described by me in my paper before the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, in May, 1891, and published in The Electrical Engineer of July 8, 1891, which has since been employed by a number of experimenters; but it has somewhat surprised me to observe that he makes use of an ordinary vibrating contact-breaker, whereas he could have employed the much simpler method of converting... continue reading »

Experiments on the Electric Discharge in Vacuum Tubes

Average: 5 (1 vote)
June 24th, 1891
Type: 
Page numbers: 
706
I have been much interested in the account of novel phenomena given under the title “ Some Experiments on the Electric Discharge in Vacuum Tubes ,” by Prof. J. J. Thomson, and published in your issue of June 10, inasmuch as several months ago I tried the same, or a very similar, experiment to that in which an induced discharge in a closed circuit vacuum receiver was obtained. Fig. 1. — Electric discharge in vacuum tube. Briefly, my experiment was performed with a closed ring made of a glass tube about one inch in diameter, the external diameter of the ring being about six inches. This was... continue reading »

Notes on a Unipolar Dynamo

Average: 4 (4 votes)
September 2nd, 1891
Type: 
Page numbers: 
258-260
It is characteristic of fundamental discoveries, of great achievements of intellect, that they retain an undiminished power upon the imagination of the thinker. The memorable experiment of Faraday with a disc rotating between the two poles of a magnet, which has borne such magnificent fruit, has long passed into every-day experience; yet there are certain features about this embryo of the present dynamos and motors which even to-day appear to us striking, and are worthy of the most careful study. Consider, for instance, the case of a disc of iron or other metal revolving between the two... continue reading »

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