Inventor Tesla Replies to Dr. Louis Duncan, Explaining His Alternating Current Motor

Average: 2 (1 vote)
June 2nd, 1888
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5
To the editor of Electrical Review: I find in your issue of last week a note of Mr. Duncan referring to my system of alternate current motors. As I see that Dr. Duncan has not as yet been made acquainted with the real character of my invention, I cannot consider his article in the light of a serious criticism and would think it unnecessary to respond; but desiring to express a my consideration for him and the importance which I attach to his opinion, I will point out here briefly the characteristic features of my invention, inasmuch as they have a direct bearing on the article above referred... continue reading »

Tesla's Latest Advances in Vacuum-Tube Lighting - Application of Tubes of High Illuminating Power to Photography and Other Purposes

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January 5th, 1898
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Page numbers: 
8 & 9
To the Editor of Electrical Review: A few years ago I began a series of experiments with a view of ascertaining the applicability of the light emitted by phosphorescent vacuum tubes to ordinary photography. The results soon showed that, even with a tube giving no more light than the equivalent of one half of a candle, objects could be easily photographed with exposures of a few minutes, and the time could be reduced at will by pushing the tube to a high candlepower. Photographs of persons were likewise obtained at that time and, if I am not mistaken, these were the first likenesses produced... continue reading »

On the Source of Roentgen Rays and the Practical Construction and Safe Operation of Lenard Tubes

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August 11th, 1897
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Page numbers: 
67 & 71
I have for some time felt that a few indications in regard to the practical construction of Lenard tubes of improved designs, a great number of which I have recently exhibited before the New York Academy of Sciences (April 6, 1897), would be useful and timely, particularly as by their proper construction and use much of the danger attending the experimentation with the rays may be avoided. The simple precautions which I have suggested in my previous communications are seemingly disregarded, and cases of injury to patients are being almost daily reported, and in view of this only, were it for... continue reading »

On Hurtful Actions of Lenard and Roentgen Tubes

Average: 5 (1 vote)
May 5th, 1897
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Page numbers: 
207 & 211
The rapidly extending use of the Lenard and Roentgen tubes or Crookes bulbs as implements of the physician, or as instruments of research in laboratories, makes it desirable, particularly in view of the possibility of certain hurtful actions on the human tissues, to investigate the nature of these influences, to ascertain the conditions under which they are liable to occur and — what is most important for the practitioner — to render all injury impossible by the observance of certain rules and the employment of unfailing remedies. As I have stated in a previous communication (see Electrical... continue reading »

Tesla on the Roentgen Streams

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December 1st, 1896
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Page numbers: 
277
The following lines may contain some useful information for physicists and physicians. Those who, in the exercise of their professional duties are applying the discoveries of Roentgen to the relief of the suffering by determining the position of foreign objects or ascertaining the condition of local troubles of malformations in the organism, are apt to be disappointed in many instances. While it is perfectly easy to find the position of a foreign object in the head, neck and all soft tissues of the body, and detect some far gone trouble in the lungs, often the location of even such a large... continue reading »

Roentgen Rays or Streams

Average: 5 (1 vote)
August 12th, 1896
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Page numbers: 
79 & 83
In the original report of his epochal discoveries, Roentgen expressed his conviction that the phenomena he observed were due to certain novel disturbances in the ether. This opinion deserves to be considered the more as it was probably formed in the first enthusiasm over the revelations, when the mind of the discoverer was capable of a much deeper insight into the nature of things. It was known since long ago that certain dark radiations, capable of penetrating opaque bodies, existed, and when the rectilinear propagation, the action on a fluorescent screen and on a sensitive film was noted,... continue reading »

Tesla Describes an Interesting Feature of the X-Ray Radiations

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July 8th, 1896
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Page numbers: 
13 & 14
The following observations, made with bulbs emitting Roentgen radiations, may be of value in throwing additional light upon the nature of these radiations, as well as illustrating better properties already known. In the main these observations agree with the views which have forced themselves upon my mind from the outset, namely, that the rays consist of streams of minute material particles projected with great velocity. In numerous experiments I have found that the matter which, by impact within the bulb, causes the formation of the rays may come from either of the electrodes. Inasmuch as... continue reading »

Tesla’s Latest Roentgen Ray Investigations

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April 22nd, 1896
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206, 207 & 211
Further investigations concerning the behavior of the various metals in regard to reflection of these radiations have given additional support to the opinion which I have before expressed; namely, that Volta’s electric contact series in air is identical with that which is obtained when arranging the metals according to their powers of reflection, the most electro-positive metal being the best reflector. Confining myself to the metals easily experimented upon, this series is magnesium, lead, tin, iron, copper, silver, gold and platinum. The lastnamed metal should be found to be the poorest,... continue reading »

On Roentgen Radiations

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April 8th, 1896
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183 & 186
Having observed the unexpected behavior of the various metals in regard to the reflection of these radiations, (see Electrical Review of April 1, 1896 ) I have endeavored to settle several still doubtful points. As, for the present, it appeared chiefly desirable to establish the exact order of the metals, or conductors, in regard to their powers of reflection, leaving for further investigation the determination of the magnitude of the effects, I modified slightly the apparatus and procedure described in my communication just referred to. The reflecting plates were not made each of one metal,... continue reading »

On Reflected Roentgen Rays

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April 1st, 1896
Type: 
Page numbers: 
171 & 174
In previous communications in regard to the effects discovered by Roentgen, I have confined myself to giving barely a brief outline of the most noteworthy results arrived at in the course of my investigations. To state truthfully, I have ventured to express myself, the first time, after some hesitation and consequent delay, and only when I had gained the conviction that the information I had to convey was a needful one; for, in common with others, I was not quite able to free myself of a certain feeling which one must experience when he is trespassing on ground not belonging to him. The... continue reading »

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