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Fig. 7. — Experiment showing a coil energized by the waves of a distant oscillator and adjusted to the capacity of the body of the operator, who preserves himself from injury by maintaining a position at the nodal point, where the intense vibration is little felt — the pressure on the end of the coil towards the reader, which is illuminated by the powerful streamers, is nearly half a million volts.
Fig. 7. — Experiment showing a coil energized by the waves of a distant oscillator and adjusted to the capacity of the body of the operator, who preserves himself from injury by maintaining a position at the nodal point, where the intense vibration is little felt — the pressure on the end of the coil towards the reader, which is illuminated by the powerful streamers, is nearly half a million volts.
Average: 5 (4 votes)
Tesla holding a gas-filled phosphor coated wireless light bulb which he developed in the 1890's, half a century before fluorescent lamps come into use. Published on the cover of the Electrical Experimenter in 1919.
Tesla holding a gas-filled phosphor coated wireless light bulb which he developed in the 1890's, half a century before fluorescent lamps come into use. Published on the cover of the Electrical Experimenter in 1919.
Photo date: 
1898
Average: 4.6 (30 votes)
Tesla holds a highly evacuated, gas-filled tube, powered by one of his high-frequency oscillator units. The one-amp tube operated without any connection to wires (“wireless energy”) over appreciable distances, which could have been greatly extended with more power. Exposure, two seconds with a lamp of 250 candlepower.
Tesla holds a highly evacuated, gas-filled tube, powered by one of his high-frequency oscillator units. The one-amp tube operated without any connection to wires (“wireless energy”) over appreciable distances, which could have been greatly extended with more power. Exposure, two seconds with a lamp of 250 candlepower.
Photo date: 
1898
Average: 4.6 (16 votes)
MARK TWAIN (Samuel Clemens) demonstrates the wireless transmission of power. A large resonating coil (not visible) has induced a high-voltage current in the wire loop he holds. The current passed harmlessly through Twain's body yet caused the incandescent bulbs to glow. Tesla is seen (obscured at far left) operating the apparatus's controls.
MARK TWAIN (Samuel Clemens) demonstrates the wireless transmission of power. A large resonating coil (not visible) has induced a high-voltage current in the wire loop he holds. The current passed harmlessly through Twain's body yet caused the incandescent bulbs to glow. Tesla is seen (obscured at far left) operating the apparatus's controls.
Average: 4.2 (5 votes)
George Westinghouse.
George Westinghouse.
Average: 2.5 (2 votes)
Figure 3.	Shadow- graph of a human foot in a shoe.Tesla obtained the image in 1896 with x-rays generated by his own vacuum tube, similar to Lenard’s tube, at a distance of 8 feet. (Courtesy of the Tesla Museum, Belgrade, Serbia; document no. MNT,VI/II, 122.)
Figure 3. Shadow- graph of a human foot in a shoe.Tesla obtained the image in 1896 with x-rays generated by his own vacuum tube, similar to Lenard’s tube, at a distance of 8 feet. (Courtesy of the Tesla Museum, Belgrade, Serbia; document no. MNT,VI/II, 122.)
Average: 5 (5 votes)
The Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the place of Tesla's funeral.
The Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the place of Tesla's funeral.
Average: 5 (2 votes)
The Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, Illinois.
The Blackstone Hotel, Chicago, Illinois.
Average: 5 (2 votes)
The Edison Machine Works building in Paris, France.
The Edison Machine Works building in Paris, France.
Average: 3.5 (2 votes)
Brigadier General L. C. Craigie, leader of "Project Nick."
Brigadier General L. C. Craigie, leader of "Project Nick."
Average: 5 (3 votes)

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